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1 Definitions


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Breathing Sheathing Board

Breathable Sheathing Board

A board which is vapour permeable enough to allow it to be used externally in timber frame construction.
(GreenSpec AEP ’09)
Used in Breathing wall and breathing roof construction outside of the insulation layer and inside the weather protection
(NGS BRM ‘10)

Breather Membrane (BM)

A water-resistant sheet which allows transmission of water vapour (usually outwards), but which provides resistance to air-flow (usually outwards)
(based on SEDA Airtightness Guide definition)
Often forms part of the Wind-tightness layer.
(BCT & NGS BRM ‘08)
It is recommended that the construction should be as vapour diffusion open as possible on the outside and as vapour diffusion tight as necessary on the inside to minimise condensation risk and maximise the drying that can occur in the event of moisture entry into the construction.
(Ecological Building Systems ’09)
A membrane which allows moisture vapour to escape whilst preventing water from entering the construction.
(GreenSpec AEP ’09)
Used in roof construction roof tile underlay or in wall construction as a damp proof membrane in Rainscreen cladding or behind timber weatherboarding.
Restricing air flow also reduced heat loss or coolth gain when the air could otherwise carry heat away.
A breather membrane is always located on the cold side of the thermal insulation.
Breather membranes are essential between open pore insulation against ventilated cavities
Partially insulated masonry cavity walls using glass rock or slag fibre insulation without a breather membrane waste heat to the cavity ventilation and stack effect in the cavity when the wall is heated by the sun.
In Austria a breather membrane will be used in a masonry cavity wall with partial fill insulation where the insulation is of an open cell or open fibre material.
Also used as an air tightness layer preventing hot air escaping from thermal insulation.
See: Wind tightness layer, airtightness layer, vapour open, Breather Membrane, BRM, Breathable Breathing Roofing Membranes,
(NGS BRM ‘09 – ’12)

Breathable Roofing Membrane (BRM)

Breathing Roofing Membranes (BRM)

Traditionally made of lihghtly bitumen imprenated felts and building papers they keep the rain out but let moisture vapour out of the construction, located under roof coverings or slate, tiles, shingles and shakes.
Increasingly being replaced by modern woven plastic fibre fabrics or plastics sheeting.
Bats like to get into roofs and sleep under the tiles to benefit from solar gains on those tiles, next to the membranes and some have been know to become entangled in the strong modern fibres.
BCT are carrying out research at Reading University on the suitability of many roofing membranes to ensure they do not ensnare bat claws and other parts.
See: Underlay, ATL, Air Tightness Layer, WTL, Wind Tightness layer, BM, Breather Membrane,
(NGS BRM ‘11)

Breathing Wall

Breathing’ walls allow a significant amount of water vapour to be absorbed and released quickly to the outside, thereby regulating the room climate and hence one aspect of indoor air quality.
Much debate and confusion continues over the value and physics involved.
(GreenSpec AEP ’09 and BRM ’10)

Building Specific Insulation Solutions

Capillary Action/Attraction

A force that can overcome gravity and facilitate moisture transport across materials.
It is reliant upon surface tension and surface muniscus in water and other liquids.
These are relient upon the nature of materials on the surface of components of buildings.
Open pored materials can absobe water, close proximity of the cell walls allows the water to be drawn from cell to cell.
Close proximity of adjacent surfaces can allow water touching both sides of a gap to use capillary attraction to move towards the narrowest gap and remain there until evapouration disperses it.
Timber should be separated by 8 mm. minimum to prevent water remaining in place, potentially saturating the timber changing its appearance locally and leading to potential rot.
Timber rainscreen with sloping top and bottom opposing surfaces should be sloping downwards and outwards and the gap between should be narrower at the bottom to encourage water downwards and wider at the top to discourage water climbing upwards.
Splashes of rainwater normally bounce as high as 150 mm. if the surface is timber with a rough surface capillary attraction can allow the surface to be wetted up to 450 mm. above the ground.
See: Moisture Transport
(NGS BRM ‘11)

Capilarity Active
Ability to release water as a liquid through its pores
(ESLtd. LB ’12)
Ability to allow liquid water to move from one place to another between surfaces in close proximity through the open cells of a material
See also: Capilliary action, Moisture Transport, Wicking
(GBE BRM ’16)

Convective Air Flow
As used with thermal bypass, this refers to air-flow that occurs in gaps between insulation and the air barrier due to temperature differences in and across the gap resulting in a stack effect or driving forces from more to less heat.
(Energy Star ’07)

Diffusion Open
Wind-tightness layers is generally a diffusion open (breather membrane or wind tightness layer).
If integrity is achieved air does not pass through but a minute amount of moisture vapour can.
(NGS BRM ‘09)
It is recommended that the construction should be as vapour diffusion open as possible on the outside and as vapour diffusion tight as necessary on the inside to minimise condensation risk and maximise the drying that can occur in the event of moisture entry into the construction.
(Ecological Building Systems ’09)
See: Vapour Open,
(NGS BRM ‘11)

Diffusion Tight
It is always recommend that a suitable vapour control layer should be applied on the warm side of the insulation layer.
(Ecological Building Systems ’09)
Air-tightness layers can be diffusion tight (vapour barriers or vapour control layers).
If integrity is achieved air does not pass through but a minute amount of moisture vapour can.
(NGS BRM ‘09)
See: Air-tightness layers, Reverse diffusion
(GBE BRM ’16)

EIRS    See: External Insulated Render Systems

ESWI   See: External Solid Wall Insulation

EWI      See: External Wall Insulation

EWIS      See: External Wall Insulation Systems

EIRS    See: External Insulated Render Systems

ESWI   See: External Solid Wall Insulation

EWI      See: External Wall Insulation

EWIS      See: External Wall Insulation Systems

 

External Insulated Render Systems (EIRS)
External finish to external solid walls (historic (where permitted): stone or brick, modern: precast concrete, brick or blockwork).
A relatively modern system based external finish usually comes with an Agrement Certificate to assure the users of its application and potential.
The first to arrive in the market had plastics or cementitious ingredients in the render and mineral fibre or foamed plastic thermal insulation; as time has progressed silica or lime based renders and wood fibre insulation are offered giving more vapour open and hygroscopic properties making them more suitable for vapour permeable historic fabric.
If used with lime based mortar and lime or clay plasters internally will remain permeable to moisture vapour but remain fairly airtight except at windows, doors and airbricks and fireplaces.
If render is to come off then it makes sense to add thermal insulation before reapplying the render.
See: ETICS, External thermal insulation composite systems, EWIS, External wall insulation systems
(GBE BRM ’12)

External Solid Wall Insulation (ESWI)
Insulation that is applied to the outside face of a solid brick, stone or block solid wall it may be a sub-system of rainscreen cladding, weatherboarding or more frequently associated with render finish.
See also: EIRS, EWI, External Wall Insulation, ETICS, M21 External Insulation with Rendered Finish
(GBE BRM ’16)

External Thermal Insulation Composite Systems (ETICS)
Solid wall insulation systems called external thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS).
ETICS are external wall insulation systems (EWIS) comprising insulation coated with render.
See: ETAG 004, Hygrothermal Performance Testing, EWI, EWIS, EIRS, External Insulated Render Systems
(GBE BRM ’12 – ‘16)

External Wall Insulation (EWI)
Insulation that is applied to the outside face of a walls of various construction it may be a sub-system of rainscreen cladding, weatherboarding or more frequently associated with render finish.
See also: ESWI, External Solid Wall Insulation, M21 External Insulation with Rendered Finish
(GBE BRM ’16)

External Wall Insulation Systems (EWIS)
See: Hygrothermal Performance Testing, ETICS,
(GBE BRM ’12)

HTT      See: Hard To Treat

Hard To Treat (HTT)
Generally applied to pre-1919, historic fabric, solid brick or stone walls.
Solid wall buildings have been given this label, implying that cavity walls are easier to treat.
However cavity walls are easy to treat inadequately, and just as hard to treat adequately, usually they have a 50 mm. cavity, even with the best injectable foamed plastics or blow fibre, insulating an external wall’s cavity will not provide a good U value.
Additional insulation will be required either internally or externally or both, so you are back to the same problems that solid walls face.
The complications start with buildings of character and ornate detailing that cannot be covered up, either by their owners not wanting to or by T&C Planning not permitting them.
Listed buildings and conservation areas usually prevent such covering up.
The character or detailing usually relates to the external details and materials but can also relate to the interior finishes or both and also relates to ornate door and window surrounds.
Then there is a complication when insulating external walls with thick insulation and not being able to return the same thikness into external jambs and internal reveals without covering some of the doors or windows or preventing them opening fully.
Futher complications arise at external surface mounted services like soil, waste and vent pipes and rainwater gutters and down pipes.
These pipes are often made of cast iron on older buildings, cast iron is brittle and the methods of assembly are historic, available in historic text books but not in current skill sets.
Dismantling in one piece without damaging them, obtaining replacements and new fittings, reconfiguring them around thick insulation and refitting them is practicalbly impossible.
An alternative is to stop and start the insulation either side, above or below, the services, but this creates a thermal bridge which will lead to problems.
Other issues occur at party walls if the other party is not insulating at the same time, at ground level and eaves level where thermal bridges occur across construction.
Other external problems occur at fences, gates, satellite dishes, telephone cables, gas meter boxes, etc.
There are standard products available on the market to solve most of these problems.
Changes in appearance in details, relating to increases in thickness by the addition of insulation or insulating materials can be prevented, even if permitted this can be complicated and even result in risky construction relating to condensation, mould, toxic mould, rot, frost and structural damage.
See: TSB Retrofit for a Future
(GBE BRM ’12 – ‘16)

Hydro-
Properties based on water
See: Hygro-, Hyprophobic,
(GBE BRM ’12)

Hydrophobic Material
One which rejects moisture from the atmosphere.
Hydrophobic materials are often used in cavity masonry construction because cavities creat damp conditions due to wind driven rain, porous materials, porous joints or open purpends, etc.
Their thermal performance is reduced by moisture uptake, because the moisture is absorbed into the airspace which normally does the insulating.
Should not be used in Breathing Construction (Vapour open construction) because it will not absorb moisture away from the surrounding timber framing.
See: Closed cell insulation
Stone mineral wool with its spun stone fibres and resin binder is hydrophobic (excludes moisture from its fibres and its resins) but it permits water and moisture vapour to pass through its interstices.
Cellular glass insulation with its hydrophobic glass cell walls and closed cell structure and paper and bitumen facings and flood coat of bitumen for laying is water resistant and vapour resistant and less vulnerable to frost action, if manufacturers instructions are followed and the insulation protected from water.
An examples have been found where water ingress met the surface of the cellular glass insulation and repeated frost action broke the outer layer of cells until the whole piece was frost damaged and became water laden.
(NGS BRM ‘10 – GBE BRM ’16)

Hygro-
Properties based on moisture vapour
See: Hydro-, Hygroscopic
(GBE BRM ’12)

Hygroscopic
Ability to absorb water as a liquid
(ESLtd. LB ’12)
Ability to absorb moisture vapour from the air spaces in a material and hold it as water in its fibres
(GBE BRM ’16)

See also: Absorb

Hygroscopic Material
One which attracts moisture vapour from the atmosphere and absobes them into the fibre of the materials as water.
Hygroscopic materials are key to the concept of ‘moisture buffering’ and ‘breathing walls’.
(GreenSpec AEP ’09)
Their thermal performance is not diminished by moisture uptake, because the moisture is absorbed into the fibre itself leaving the trapped airspaces to insulate.
By absorbing the water into the fibre it leaves the still air spaces between the fibres in the material to insulate.
Are used in Breathing Construction (Vapour open construction)
(NGS BRM ’09 – GBE BRM ’16)

Hygroscopicity
Other properties that play a part in thermal insulation’s performance, relate to moisture content of the insulation.
If hydrophobic insulation absorbs water it becomes moist or if it suffers from intersticial condensation of humid air in the material this can significantly reduce the insulation’s performance.
The moisture contained in the material occupies the space of the trapped air, preventing the air from doing the job of insulating.
In the case of hygroscopic natural fibres the moisture can be absorbed into the fibres themselves leaving the air space moisture-free allowing the air to continue to do the job of insulating.
There are very few Hygroscopic products suitable for use in damp masonry cavity wall construction.
(NGS BRM ’10 – GBE BRM ‘16)
Materials characterised by the expression ‘Hygroscopic’ are those that absorb moisture, into the material itself store it, and at a later time, release it.
(GreenSpec AEP ’10)

Hygroscopicity And Moisture Mass
Moisture mass can absorb moisture vapour into the material and into its air spaces and its action is focused on absorption from surface condensation and absorption from humid atmosphere in room.
Absorbing surface condensation removes water which would reactivate spores landing on damp surfaces and so avoids the risk of mildue and mould.
Hygroscopicity is important inside building elements, hygroscopic insulating materials can prevent what would otherwise become interstitial condensation, they will absorb the moisture from its airspaces into the fibre to maintain the insulation value of the matrials.
(NGS BRM ’11 – GBE BRM ’16)

Hygrothermal Performance Testing
The BBA has just taken delivery of a new rig which tests the hygrothermal performance of solid wall insulation systems called external thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS) to the European Technical Approval Guideline (ETAG) 004. ETICS are external wall insulation systems (EWIS) comprising insulation coated with render.
The new rig is extremely versatile and can meet the requirements of a number of different test specifications.
The ETAG 004 test regime involves subjecting an insulated solid wall to a series of extreme temperature cycles.
This tests how the insulation system will react over time to changes in moisture (humidity) and temperature.
The tests and assessment methods outlined in ETAG 004 have been written with an intended working life of 25 years in mind.
The test regime subjects the insulation system to repeated cycles of heat and rain, then heat and cold, and finally heat, rain, freeze and thaw.
These cycles are completed in strict order for a set amount of time.
During these series of cycles the system can be exposed to temperatures as high as 70°C and as low as -15°C mimicking the extreme weather conditions the insulation system could face during its expected working life.
Once complete the test wall is assessed for damage such as surface blisters, flaking, delamination, cracks and other visible changes.
Although mainly aimed at ETICS, other materials such as cement particle boards, glass reinforced plastic (GRP) and MgO boards can also be tested.
The new rig is a significant investment by the BBA and it has been made to address the growth of interest in hygrothermal testing of external wall insulation systems due, in part, to the ability to CE mark this type of insulation system. Although CE marking remains voluntary, for products that do not fall within the scope of a harmonized European Standard (hEN), a manufacturer can obtain CE marking through assessment against the appropriate European Technical Assessment (ETA) and a system of assessment and verification of constancy of performance procedure.
The ETAG 004 hygrothermal test is significantly shorter than other similar tests and coupled with the improved efficiency and versatility of the new rig, cycle times are significantly reduced compared to the test rigs previously used by the BBA. This means a quicker throughput of work increasing the capacity to cope with the anticipated higher level of demand. However, companies are advised to contact the BBA as soon as possible to ensure their products can be scheduled for testing in plenty of time.
Contact: testing@bba.star.co.uk
T            01923 665300.
(©BBA 2011)

Interstitial Condensation
Occurs when relatively warm moisture-laden air diffuses into a vapour-permeable material or structure such as fibrous insulation or a porous brick wall.
If it is relatively warm on one side and below the dew point temperature on the other; this can result in the moisture-laden air reaching ‘dew point’ within the material and depositing liquid water at this point.
Interstitial condensation presents a problem when it remains undetected, threatening structural damage such as timber decay, or degrading the effectiveness of insulation.
(GreenSpec AEP ’09)
Interstitial condensation is a form of structural damping that occurs when warm, moist air penetrates inside a wall, roof or floor structure, reaches the dew point and condenses into liquid water.
(Wikipeadia ’16)

Warm, moisture vapour in air entering and passing through building elements (roof, wall or floor) reaches a point where the temperature of the material and air within it is reduced, reaches the due point, the moisture vapour changes phase, condenses to become liquid water inside the material’s interstices (pores), in the air spaces between fibres or material.
Depending upon the properties of the materials in the element, particularly absorbent insulating materials, the moisture could reduce the performance of the insulation or the moisture is absorbed into the fibres letting the insulation continue to perform.
(GBE BRM ’16)

Surface Condensation:
Warm, moisture vapour in internal air entering and passing through building elements (roof, wall or floor) reaches a point where the temperature of the material at the internal surface or other cavity surfaces is cold enough to affect the air adjacent to it.
The reduced temperature surface, cools the moisture vapour in the air, it reaches the due point, the moisture vapour changes phase, condenses to become liquid water of the surface of the material.

Depending upon the properties of the materials at the surface(s) of the element, particularly with absorbent or moisture permeable materials and insulation materials, the moisture can be absorbed into the surface material.
Condensate on surfaces has the ability to ractivate ever present spores and stimulate the development of mould which can lead to fruiting spores and release of more spores into the construction where it can stimulate rot, or into the room where it can affect health, impair breathing, cause asthma and worse.
In the case of moisture absorbent materials, condensate is removed from the surface, absorbed and released later when conditions improve.
This moisture could reduce the performance of insulation or the moisture could be absorbed into the fibres letting the insulation continue to perform.
See: Hygroscopic, Hydrophobic, Interstitial Condensation
(GBE BRM ’16)

Internal Solid Wall Insulation
Insulation that is applied to the inside face of a walls of external brick, stone or block walls it may be a sub-system of plasterboard dry lining, timber board or sheet linings or more frequently associated with thermal laminates.
See also: IWI, Internal Wall Insulation, K10 Plasterboard dry linings/partitios/ceilings, K11 Rigid sheet flooring/sheating/decking/sarking/lining/casings, K13 Rigid sheet fine linings/paneling, K20 Timber board flooring/decking/sarking/lining/casing K21 Timber strip/board fine flooring/linings, P10 Sundry insulation/proofing work/fire stops, SWI, Solid wall insulation
(GBE BRM ’16)

Internal Wall Insulation
Insulation that is applied to the inside face of external walls of various construction it may be a sub-system of plasterboard dry lining, timber board or sheet linings or more frequently associated with thermal laminates.
See also: ISWI, Internal Solid Wall Insulation, K10 Plasterboard dry linings/partitios/ceilings, K11 Rigid sheet flooring/sheating/decking/sarking/lining/casings, K13 Rigid sheet fine linings/paneling, K20 Timber board flooring/decking/sarking/lining/casing K21 Timber strip/board fine flooring/linings, P10 Sundry insulation/proofing work/fire stops, SWI, Solid wall insulation
(GBE BRM ’16)

ISWI     See: Internal Solid Wall Insulation

Parge Coat
A single base coat of plaster applied to the inside face of masonry walls to achieve a level of air tightness before applying plasterboard drylining.
Ironically plasterboard was introduced to eliminate wet trade plaster, parge coats reintroduce them.
If a solid external wall has moisture resistant, oil paint, cement or gypsum plaster on the inside surface it should be removed improve its moisture permeability, it may need a parge coat to replace it.
Parge coats were introduced to make solid walls and cavity walls airtight before installing internal dry linings.
Ideally parge coats are also hygroscopic and have moisture transport characteristics so do not want to be made of gypsum but best made of lime, clay or proprietry material with the same charachteristics.
It may consist of 9 mm coat of lime plaster, however it can become a final finish by adding a lime finish coat and microporous natural or mineral paint.
See: Drylining,
(NGS BRM ’09 – GBE BRM ’16)

Path Of Least Resistance
When heat and moisture vapour are present in or around building fabric they will try to move towards coolth and drier conditions to dissipate.
The materials they pass through will offer resistance or permit transfer depending on their characteristics.
Materials with the ideal charachteristics will offer the path of least resistance.
Ideal characteristics might include vapour permeability, moisture transport, capillary action.
The direction of travel may be inwards or outwards depending upon the relative conditions inside and outside and may vary over time of day/night and seasons and depending upon the space heating and moisture generating activities in a building.
(GBE BRM ’16)

Retrofit Health & Safety
Refurbishment measures which address ‘Health’ of the occupants and ‘Safety’ of the building fabric
(ESLtd. LB ’12 & GBE BRM ‘16)

Risk Assessment
The procedure in which the risks posed by inherent hazards involved in processes or situations are estimated either quantitatively or qualitatively.
(© DANTES ’06)
Risk assessments are often associated with new build projects, but there are many risks in modifying existing buildings.
Insulating external solid walled buildings is fraught with problems, many are not addressed and remain serious problems that will go wrong and become retrofit health and safety hazards.
(GBE BRM ’16)

Specific Heat Capacity
Wood fibre, cellulose and cellular glass insulation has this characteristic in abundance and provides protection from solar gains, and heat loss by storing heat in the fabric of the material.
(GBE BRM ’16)

Solid Wall Insulation (SWI)
Can be Internal: ISWI or IWI or external: ESWI or EWI
Insulation that is applied to the inside or outside face of a external walls of brick, stone, block or other constructions;
it may be a sub-system of plasterboard dry lining, timber board or sheet linings or more frequently associated with thermal laminates.
it may be a sub-system of rainscreen cladding, weatherboarding or more frequently associated with render finish.
See also: IWI, Internal Wall Insulation, EWI, External Wall Insulation, K10 Plasterboard dry linings/partitios/ceilings, K11 Rigid sheet flooring/sheating/decking/sarking/lining/casings, K13 Rigid sheet fine linings/paneling, K20 Timber board flooring/decking/sarking/lining/casing K21 Timber strip/board fine flooring/linings, M21 External Insulation with Rendered Finish P10 Sundry insulation/proofing work/fire stops, SWI, Solid wall insulation
(GBE BRM ’16)

Solid Wall Insulation Guarantee Agency (SWIGA)
SWIGA have insulation industry initiatives and schemes designed to provide consumer confidence and protection.
Having investigated further it seems the installing contractor is required to meet the specification to permit issuing of the certificate; if the specification is inadequate and thermal bridges are not addressed in the specification, and thermal bridges are created in the works, risking condensation mould, asthma, toxic mould and death; then that’s okay!
See: CIGA, ECO, GreenDeal, NIA
(NGS BRM ‘11 – GBE BRM ‘16)
SWI      See: Solid Wall Insulation

SWIGA   See: Solid Wall Insulation Guarantee Agency

 

Thermal Laminates
Plasterboard with insulation layer on the back with or without vapour control layer of polyethylene or aluminium foil.
May be part of an IWI or ISWI.
(GBE BRM ’16)

Thermal Looping

See: Convective Air flow

Vapour Check
Since little care is often given to design, specification and workmanship in vapour barriers they often do not achieve their objective i.e. integrity; due to leaky joints or low performance materials.
In the UK the term ‘vapour check’ was adopted to describe a partial vapour barrier or to reducing but not stopping the passage of vapour.
See: Vapour Diffusion Resistance
(NGS BRM ’09 – GBE BRM ‘16)

Vapour Closed
The UK timber framed sector adopts vapour closed construction and it would be difficult to change habits overnight
We like cheap insulation and choose rock, slag and glass mineral fibre, which go with vapour closed construction.
We treat timber unnecessarily in timber frame because we are incompetent at vapour closed construction
Until we pay for appropriate materials aiming for competent construction we have little hope of change.
Choose vapour proof membranes inside to make airtight vapour check and use vapour permeable membrane outside to make breather membrane
The BS 5250 1:5 rule applies (5 times more resistant inside than outside)
(NGS BRM ’11 – GBE BRM ‘16)

Vapour Closed V Vapour Open
Vapour closed has many weaknesses whilst vapour open has many strengths
Its important to understand the characteristics each component must have for vapour open to be competent
No compromises, or revert to vapour closed, do not mix approaches.
We compromide on choice of thermal insulation matereials and so we must stick with vapour closed with the cheap insulation.
(NGS BRM ’11 – GBE BRM ‘16)

Vapour Control Layer (VCL)
A layer impervious to water vapour and usually enclosing an occupied space.
(SEDA Scottish Environmental Design Association)
It is always recommend that a vapour control layer should be applied on the warm side of the insulation layer.
(Ecological Building Systems ’09)

Vapour Diffusion Resistance & Vapour Barrier/Check
µ value is the vapour resistance factor of a material (see also ISO EN 12524).
d is the thickness of a layer.
sd is the equivalent air layer thickness
i.e. a vapour barrier with an sd of 1500 m is equivalent to 1500 m thickness of still air in terms of vapour resistance and is calculated as follows :
sd [m] = µ x d [m]
vapour check: 0.5 m < sd < 1,500 m
vapour barrier: sd > 1,500 m
(BRE IP 2/05 Modelling and Controlling Interstitial Condensation in Buildings. 2005)

Vapour Open
The UK timber framed sector does not adopt vapour open construction and it would be difficult to change habits overnight
Whilst we like cheap insulation like rock, slag and glass mineral fibre we must go with vapour closed construction.
We treat timber unnecessarily in timber frame because we are incompetent at vapour closed
Until we pay for appropriate materials aiming for competent construction we have little hope of change.
Choose vapour open membrane or insulation boards inside to make airtight vapour permeable membrane inside and wind tight water proof vapour open membrane outside.
The BS 5250 1:5 rule probably applies but intelligent membranes may well break that rule.
(NGS BRM ’11 – GBE BRM ‘16)

Vapour Open Breathable

Vapour Open V Vapour Closed
Vapour closed has many weaknesses whilst vapour open has many strengths
Its important to understand the characteristics each component must have for vapour open to be competent
No compromises, or revert to vapour closed, do not mix approaches.
(NGS BRM ’11 – GBE BRM ‘16)

Vapour Permeable
Can transfer water as vapour
(ESLtd. LB ’12)
Can transfer moisture vapour from one side to the other of the building element, through the materials
(GBE BRM ’16)

Vapour Tight

Vapour Tight With Reverse Membrane

Variable Difussion Membrane

(ESLtd. LB ’12)


© GBE NGS ASWSBrianSpecMan aka BrianMurphy
18th January 2016 – 28th July 2018

Jargon
2 Images/Icons


© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016 – 10th December 2016

Jargon
3 Relevance to Environmental Construction


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© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016 -10th December 2016

Jargon
4 Opinion


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© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016

Jargon
5 Examples


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© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016

Jargon
6 Notes


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© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016

Jargon
7 Sources


  • Ecological Building Systems ’09
  • Energy Star ’07
  • Enviroform Solutions Ltd. LB ‘12
  • GreenSpec AEP ’09
  • GBE BRM ’12-’16
  • NGS BRM ’09-‘12
  • SEDA Airtightness Guide definition
  • Wikipaedia

© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016 – 10th December 2016

Jargon
9 Checklists


GBE Checklist

New Build Checklist Navigation G#606 N#627

  • K10 Plasterboard dry linings/partitios/ceilings
  • K11 Rigid sheet flooring/sheating/decking/sarking/lining/casings
  • K13 Rigid sheet fine linings/paneling
  • K20 Timber board flooring/decking/sarking/lining/casing
  • K21 Timber strip/board fine flooring/linings
  • K43 Raised Storage Access Systems (Checklist) G#13934
  • M21 External Insulation with Rendered Finish
  • P10 Sundry insulation/proofing work/fire stops

EBC Checklist Refurbishment G#730 N#752

  • K10 Plasterboard dry linings/partitios/ceilings
  • K11 Rigid sheet flooring/sheating/decking/sarking/lining/casings
  • K13 Rigid sheet fine linings/paneling
  • K20 Timber board flooring/decking/sarking/lining/casing
  • K21 Timber strip/board fine flooring/linings
  • K43 Raised Storage Access Systems (Checklist) G#13934
  • M21 External Insulation with Rendered Finish
  • P10 Sundry insulation/proofing work/fire stops

EBC Checklist Refurbishment Decent Homes G#1253 N#1252

Home Improvement Index G#1438 N#1408


© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016 – 10th December 2016

Jargon
10 Q and A


GBE Q&A


© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016 – 10th December 2016

Jargon
11 Defects/Solutions


GBE Defects

  • External Wall Insulation: Insulation with Rendered Finish
  • GreenDeal & ECO failings

GBE Solutions


© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016

Jargon
12 CPD/Lectures


GBE CPD

Theme

CPD Topics Navigation G#472 N#478

Handouts PDF 9 slides/page for printing

Seminars PDF for viewing


GBE Lectures


© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016 – 10th December 2016

Jargon
15 Products


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© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016

Jargon
16 Accessories


Enviroform Solutions Ltd.

Thermo-Pro Thermally insulated profiles for EWI (External wall insulation)

  • 1 Thermo-Bead
    • (Window/Door Reveal Lining for EWI)
  • 2 Thermo-Pro Soil Pipe
    • (behind vertical and sloping pipes & other abutments in EWI)
  • 3 Thermo-Pro Fascia
    • (EWI abutments at eaves with little or no overhang)
  • Thermo-Flash
    • (Lead Flashing for EWI to pitched roof)
  • Thermo-Trac
    • (Below DPC EWI skirting with RWP cutout)
  • 6 Thermo-Trac Dynamic
  • 7 Thermo-Pro Finlock
    • (Precast concrete gutter Fascia
  • 8 Thermo-Pro Eaves/Gutter
    • (abutments for EWI)
  • 9 Thermo-Flash (Gutter Fascia)
  • 10 Thermo-Pro Column Cladding Insulation

External Floor/Walkway and roof terrace/balcony insulation systems

  • Underside:
    •  Floor Soffit Cable trunking Insulation
      • Thermo-Pro Thermally insulated profiles for IWI
  • Thermo-Pro Thermally insulated profiles/Accessories for IWI (Internal Wall Insulated lining)
    • 8 Thermo-Soc
      • (Thermal break for electrical socket in IWI)
    • 9 Magna-Reveal (Jamb lining for IWI)
    • 10 DIY Thermal Reveal/Return Kit
    • 11 Thermo-Joist
  • Solid Wall Masonry Accessories
    1. Sil-T Vapour permeable biocide sealer for masonry
    2. SIL-T20 Vapour permeable Impregnating Adhesive

© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016

Jargon
17 Systems/Sub-systems


Enviroform Solutions Ltd.

GBE Sub-systems

  • EWI External Wall Insulation System by Enviroform Solutions Ltd.
    • External Wall & Walkway/Balcony/Roof Parapet Sides:
  • IWI internal wall insulation by others
    • Thermo-Soc Accessory by Enviroform Solutions Ltd.
  • IWI internal wall insulation by Enviroform Solutions Ltd.
    • E-line Superslim
    • E-Line Slim
    • E-line Natural
    • E-Line Natural-Hybrid
  • EWI External Wall Insulation System by others
    • Accessories by Enviroform Solutions Ltd. 
      • Renderline Superslim
  • Square hollow steel columns by others
    • Insulating cladding by Enviroform Solutions Ltd.
  • Ultratherm Aerogel Flooring for retrofit
    • E-Therm Slim Floor
      • (Insulated Dry Floor System)
  • External Floor/Walkway and roof terrace/balcony insulation systems
    • Topside:
      • Instaline Superslim Balcony Insulation Solution
      • CTF (Cut to Fall) Superslim Balcony/Terrace Insulation Solution
      • Cut to fall Balcony Insulation
    • Parapet Side:
      • Renderline Superslim
    • Underside:
      • E-Line (all 4 systems?)
    • Underside Accessories:
      • Floor Soffit Cable/Pipe tray Insulation
  • Pitched Roof Insulation
    • Within Batten Zone

© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016

Jargon
18 Issue Papers



© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
18th January 2016 – 10th December 2016

© GBE NGS ASWSBrianSpecMan aka BrianMurphy
17th January 2016 – 28th July 2016

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