GBE Refurbishment Decent Homes (Checklist) G#1253 N#1252

Decent Homes Checklist

GBE > Code > Checklist > G#1253 N#1252

GBE Refurbishment Decent Homes (Checklist)
Index:


Content is complete but could be developed further for GreenDeal & ECO but the Government has abandoned these schemes, we still await their replacement


WORK TO EXISTING BUILDINGS: ECO REFURBISHMENT

Decent Homes

  • Decent Homes programme bringing inadequately equipped homes (due to their age and few if any improvements over a long period) up to a minimum standard set by Housing Corporation
  • This applies to: existing housing stock within the control of
    • London Borough’s,
    • Local Authority’s,
    • Responsible Social Landlords (RSL) and
    • Arms Length Management Organisations (ALMO)
  • How can this process be turned greener without adding to whole life-cycle costs?
  • This has been written in the absence of sight or the Decent Homes Standard.

Much of this applies to any refurbishment of houses and any refurbishment of other building types.


Areas to consider:

  • Kitchens
  • Bathrooms
  • Windows
  • Electrics re-wiring
  • Central Heating replacements
  • Domestic Water supply renewals
  • Painting and Decorating
  • Condensation eradication
  • Roof Repairs/replacement
  • Basements

The bigger picture first:

  • Nationwide programme
  • Contracts for 30,000 houses and bigger
  • Waste generated adding to a 90m tonne/annum burden?

Seriously consider on-site segregation if practical

Local

  • At each house using 2 and 4 wheel bins and fork lift tipper skips
  • Collect and segregate waste as it is generated
  • Segregate Hazardous, active, inert, inactive, recyclable, and each material separately

Central

  • Decant into larger segregated bins or skips

Remote (still on site)

  • Decant to Rear End Loaders (REL), Front End Loaders (FEL), REL Roll-On, and conventional skips ready for collection

Procure off site segregation if impractical on site

  • Segregate: Hazardous, inert, compressible packaging and mixed to keep costs down

Upgrade v Replace

Reusable v Waste

Whole life cost v Initial cost


Comply with Code for Sustainable Homes or EcoHomes (Excellent or better) whilst your at it

Adding thermal insulation?

  • Surely this is fundemental
  • if you don’t do it now them most of the heating systems may have to be refitted later when the insulation is added internally

Kitchen Refurbishment

New worktops

  • Solid wood laminate
  • Ikea have 2 options

New fronts

  • Not MDF nor chipboard
  • Solid wood or ply
  • Forest Stewardship Council (Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)) certified wood and ply

New sinks

  • Not plastic
  • Stainless steel
  • Round conical bowel (small water capacity for small units)
  • Double round conical bowel for wash and rinse (for large family units)

New sink taps

  • Not plastic
  • Taps 2 flow settings
  • Low flow sprinkler and full flow to fill sink
  • Isolator/flow restrictor valves on supplies on low flow setting

New Appliances

  • Energy efficient A Rated (high within A range)
  • Significant cut in fuel use, costs and CO2 generation over life of building
  • Voltage optimisation on 13 amp socket or whole house

New waste bins

  • With segregation compartments
  • minimum 3 compartments
  • Compostable
  • Recyclable
  • Waste

Kitchen Removal

Waste Resource Action Programme (WRAP) not interested

  • Careful removal
  • Value in materials for reuse

Reuse on or off site

  • Stainless steel sinks
  • Taps
  • Export to 3rd world
  • They want ‘a kitchen’ let alone ‘a decent one’
  • ARC Solutions with DORWIN and BKP (Waste) offer a solution they want cargo ships full

Recycling opportunities off-site

  • Chipboard: complications with melamine facings
  • MDF: complications with melamine facings
  • Copper pipe
  • Lead pipes (back to lead roofing manufacturers)

Kitchen Replacement

New design

  • better layout around ‘wash prep cook triangle’
  • don’t forget left handed people,
  • but don’t forget efficient plumbing and drainage
  • Maximise reuse of existing drains below floor and ground
  • Other finishes may require removing/replacing/refinishing?

New Carcass

  • Plywood and durable softwood
  • Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood and ply

New worktops

  • Solid wood laminate
  • Ikea has 2 options

New fronts

  • Not MDF nor chipboard
  • Solid wood or ply
  • Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood and ply

New Sinks and taps

  • Not plastic
  • Stainless steel
  • Round conical bowel (small capacity for small units)
  • Double round conical bowel for wash and rinse (for large family units)
  • Taps 2 flow settings
  • Low flow sprinkler and full flow to fill sink
  • Isolator/flow restrictor valves on supplies, set low

New Appliances

  • Energy efficient A Rated (high within A range)
  • Significant cut in fuel use, costs and CO2 generation over life of building
  • Voltage optimisation on 13 amp plug  to fridge and freezer or whole house

New waste bins

  • With segregation compartments
  • minimum 3
  • Compostable
  • Recyclable
  • Waste

Bathrooms Refurbishment

Recoating baths insitu
New bath fronts and surrounds

  • Plywood and durable softwood
  • Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood and ply

Replacing Taps

  • Low flow sprinklers
  • Proximity taps
  • Isolator/flow restrictor valves on supplies set low
  • WC Cisterns
  • Water saving devices
  • Hippo and Gel bags

New Showers

  • Not electric heater shower
  • Not power shower
  • Low water use showers
  • Hot water supply

Bathroom Removal

Bathroom removal

  • WRAP not interested
  • Careful removal
  • Value in materials for reuse
  • Segregation on site
  • China & Ceramics
  • Steel & Cast Iron
  • Plastics
  • Taps
  • Timber

Reuses off site especially character pieces and in quantity

  • China
  • Cast Iron
  • Taps

Recycling off site

  • China and ceramics as aggregate in concrete
  • Steel into steel making
  • Plastics?
  • Timber: chipping for chipboard and ply

Bathroom Renewals

New appliances and materials

  • Water efficient appliance and taps
  • Low water WC & Cisterns
  • Low flush 4.5 litre
  • Dual flush 4.5/2.5 litre

Basins

  • Locally sourced?
  • Toilet seat and lid
  • Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Certified timber
  • Tough rigid plastics

Baths

  • Water efficient profile (low capacity)

Basin

  • Taps
  • Low flow sprinklers
  • Proximity taps
  • Isolator/flow restrictor valves on supplies set low

Showers

  • Not electric heater shower
  • Hot water supply
  • Not power shower unless water flow rate is too low for adequate shower
  • Efficient low water use showers gravity-fed

Bath fronts and surrounds

  • Plywood and durable softwood
  • Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood and ply

Window refurbishment

Timber

  • Victorian timber windows 100 years old, why stop now?
  • If in good state of repair consider upgrading with new DGSU and modify beads or frame

Modern alternative

  • Timber: 60 years with maintenance regime
  • Timber/Aluminium composite: 60 years with maintenance regime
    • Companies specialise in timber window refurbishment/upgrade
    • Insitu or at factory
    • Phased working to suit programme
    • Consider High Performance Micro-porous Finish to all faces
    • Coat before reinstalling
  • Steel
    • Failed galvanizing
    • Scrape down and re-protect with zinc rich epoxy paint scheme
    • Consider removing, stripping, pickling and re galvanizing
    • Failed paint system
    • Scrape down and redecorate with relatively short life paint scheme or better still long life paint scheme.
    • Failed Powder Coating
    • Shorter life expectancy early gloss formulations but unlikely to have failed (gloss 10 year guarantee whilst matt 15 years)
    • Single glazing
    • May be scope to obtain replacement metal beads to suit DGSU
  • Aluminium
    • Mill finish
    • White oxidation deposits can make casements stick
    • Wire wool and lubricant
    • Powder Coating
    • Shorter life expectancy early gloss formulations but unlikely to have failed (gloss 10 year guarantee whilst matt 15 years)
  • PVC
    • Short life already?
    • Too soon to need replacing.
    • Modern alternative
    • PVC: 20 years or less, difficult to maintain

Window removal

Window Removal

  • WRAP/BRE Conference 4th Oct 2004 See Web sites for papers and publications
  • Recycling flat glass
  • Publication issued
  • Report to be published
  • Separating materials on site
  • Glass & Sealed units
  • Putty Spoils glass recycling recipe
  • Sealants Hazardous waste
  • Frames
  • Wood
  • Steel
  • Aluminium
  • PVC
  • Beads
  • Frame Reinforcement
  • Spacers
  • Ironmongery
  • Fasteners
  • Weather-stripping

Window replacements

Materials

  • Avoid short life PVC
  • Avoid high embodied energy Aluminium
  • Consider thermally broken steel
  • Consider durable timber
  • Consider durable timber with aluminium bottom bead and sill
  • Consider durable timber with aluminium outer face

Finishes

  • Consider High Performance Micro-porous factory finish to all faces of timber

Electrics refurbishment

Wiring

  • Little scope to refurbish wiring
  • Its normal practice to update wiring, is this driven by insurance?
  • But is it necessary?
  • The Copper may be okay but the plastic sheathing may not.
  • If so why put in more of the same?

Accessories

  • Reusing of existing accessories, face plates, switches, if in working order
  • Updating of accessories if required
  • Reconsider updating if unnecessary

Electrics removal

  • Wiring
  • If run in conduit ensure draw wires are introduced as wires are withdrawn
  • PVC sheathed wires are bad news in landfill sites
  • Copper in landfill is a serious waste of resources
  • Segregate wires from all other waste and recycle copper and PVC

Electrics replacement

Wiring

  • Take the opportunity to replace PVC sheathed cable
  • Consider Low Smoke sheathed cable (Not PVC sheathing)
  • Consider surface mounting in hollow skirting, dado and architraves
  • Avoid burying wiring in or under thermal insulation without increasing wire gauge to suit and insulation to avoid cold bridge,

New Electric Services

  • Avoid adding electric heating, cooking, hot water, showers etc. unless Renewable supply is provided
  • Consider replacing any electric services with alternatives
  • Increase efficiency of any kit to reduce demand
  • Aim to double the efficiency
  • Don’t be tempted to add lots of kit with LED indicators, it just keeps the power stations working all night

Electricity supply

  • Consider CHP to provide electricity and heat
  • Where controllable obtain Green Tariff electricity supplies
  • Provide Green tariff anyway,
  • Use Green tariff throughout refurbishment contract

Central Heating Refurbishment

Thermal Insulation

  • Building fabric
    • Don’t improve/replace heating system until insulation is improved as much as possible
    • Optimum 300 mm.
    • New boilers may be efficient but cost a lot,
    • You get more insulation per pound than boilers
    • With good insulation the size of boiler needed will reduce significantly
    • The benefits are enormous: initial costs, running costs, CO2 reduction
  • Pipes or voids
    • Lagging pipes is labour intensive and often incomplete
    • Insulated foam rubber is okay if sizes are available
    • Corners, tees and bends often inadequately carried out
    • Consider filling the voids they are contained within
    • Pour in or spray on fibrous materials fills voids well

Heating Boilers

  • Check efficiency compared to A rated today
  • SEDBUK Efficiency Rating A
  • Gas: 91.3% – 90.0%; LPG: 93.3% – 90.0%; Oil: 97.0% – 90.0%
  • If significantly lower replace
  • Check inter-seasonal efficiency as well

Flues

  • Check for blockages and damage and smoke blow back
  • Check for efficiency and check attachments for leakages

Radiators

  • Size:
  • If very bulky Cast Iron may benefit from replacement with thin radiators if rooms small
  • Performance and repair
  • Check for air locks and bleed
  • Check for corrosion and leaks
  • Check valves and leaks
  • Add TRV Thermostatic Radiator Valves if not present
  • Windows
  • Consider moving radiators away from under window
  • Best heat goes out the window if ajar
  • Heat goes through window if of low performance

Reflectors:

  • Consider fitting purpose made reflector roll or sheet to wall behind radiator

Pipes

  • Reuse if possible
  • Remove paint and start again
  • Copper
  • Can be reused and should be if possible
  • Ensure earth bonding is in good condition
  • Plastics
  • Its too soon to be replacing them

Central Heating Removal

Thermal Insulation

  • Building fabric
  • Reuse
  • Do not remove unless a health hazard or so badly fitted it causes thermal bridges
  • Consider for reuse on site if suitable

Recycle

  • Bag up, label and segregate from other waste
  • Some manufacturers use recycled content but want large quantities
  • Consider segregation on or off site at transfer stations/bulking stations
  • return to manufacturer in quantity

Pipes or voids

  • Un-lagging pipes is labour intensive, expensive and often incomplete
  • Insulated foam rubber is easily removed unless taped at all joints
  • Insulated foam rubber is easily reusable

Heating Boilers

  • Remove low A-D rated boilers or if incompatible with updated system
  • Strong refurbishment and resale market exists
  • Damaged boilers can be used for salvaging components to repair others

Flues

  • Reuse masonry chimneys and flues is suitable
  • Check for blockages and damage and smoke blow back
  • Check for efficiency and check attachments for leakages
  • Insitu repairs if possible
  • Asbestos based
  • Replace Asbestos based
  • Take extra care with parts and dust
  • Hazardous waste: segregate, back up and seal
  • Send to licensed Hazardous Waste sites via Licensed Haz. Waste Carriers
  • Cast Iron will have resale value

Radiators

  • If very bulky Cast Iron may benefit from replacement with thin radiators if rooms small
  • Check for air locks and bleed
  • Check for corrosion and leaks
  • Check valves and leaks
  • Add TRV Thermostatic Radiator Valves if not present

Pipes

  • Reuse if possible
  • Remove paint and start again
  • Copper
  • Can be reused and should be if possible
  • Ensure earth bonding is in good condition
  • Plastics
  • Its too soon to be replacing them

Central Heating Replacement

Thermal Insulation

  • Building fabric
  • Don’t replace heating system until insulation is improved as much as possible
  • Optimum 300 mm.
  • New boilers may be efficient but cost a lot,
  • You get more insulation per pound than boilers
  • With good insulation the size of boiler needed will reduce significantly
  • The benefits are enormous: initial costs, running costs, CO2 reduction

Pipes or voids

  • Lagging pipes is labour intensive and often incomplete
  • Insulated foam rubber is okay if sizes are available
  • Corners, tees and bends often inadequately done
  • Consider filling the voids they are contained within
  • Pour in or spray on fibrous materials fills voids well

Heating Boilers

  • Condensing boilers
  • Use SEDBUK Efficiency Rating A, no less
  • Gas: 91.3% – 90.0%; LPG: 93.3% – 90.0%; Oil: 97.0% – 90.0%
  • Check inter-seasonal efficiency as well
  • If using under-floor heating look as modular (modulating) boilers and those designed to work with them
  • Ensure in-use performance is optimum

Flues

  • Double skin insulated stainless steel flue liners

Radiators

  • Size:
  • Bulky Cast Iron radiators may not be appropriate
  • Thin steel radiators if rooms small
  • Performance
  • Add TRV Thermostatic Radiator Valves if not present
  • Windows
  • Consider new design moving radiators away from under window
  • Best heat goes out the window if ajar
  • Heat goes through window if of low performance
  • Reflectors:
  • Consider fitting purpose made reflector roll or sheet to wall behind radiator

Pipes

  • Reuse existing, teeing off where required, if possible
  • New Materials
  • Copper
  • Add earth bonding
  • Plastics
  • What design life?
  • What guarantees?

Domestic Water supply Refurbishment

Thermal Insulation

  • Pipes or voids
  • Lagging pipes is labour intensive and often incomplete
  • Insulated foam rubber is okay if sizes are available
  • Corners, tees and bends often inadequately done
  • Consider filling the voids they are contained within
  • Pour in or spray on fibrous materials fill voids well

Tank

Cylinder

  • Inspect and repair any damage to existing insulation
  • Feel all way around back of cylinder to check
  • Loose jackets are not ideal but multiple overlapping layers helps

Pipes

  • Lead
  • Must be replaced
  • Copper
  • Can be reused and should be if possible
  • Ensure pipes and earth bonding is in good condition
  • Plastics
  • Internally: Its too soon to be replacing them
  • Below ground pipes: inspect for servicability

Heat source

  • Heating boiler
    • Check efficiency compared to A rated today
    • SEDBUK Efficiency Rating A
    • Gas: 91.3% – 90.0%; LPG: 93.3% – 90.0%; Oil: 97.0% – 90.0%
    • If significantly lower replace
  • Hot water boiler
    • Water heaters over sinks

Tanks

  • Inspect for corrosion or other
  • Inspect valve for corrosion deposits or operational weakness or failure
  • Replace valves with low noise, efficient filling and minimise water loss
  • Attic cistern thermal insulation enclosure

Cylinders

  • _

Taps

  • Sink Taps variable flow settings with 2 stops
  • Low flow sprinkler and full flow to fill sink and between
  • Valves
  • Isolator/flow restrictor valves on supplies, set low

Domestic Water supply Removal

Thermal Insulation

  • Pipes or voids
    • Un-lagging pipes is labour intensive, expensive and often incomplete
    • Insulated foam rubber is easily removed unless taped at all joints
    • Insulated foam rubber is easily reusable

Tank

  • May prove difficult unless demountable or flexible or smashed
  • Avoid smashing asbestos fibre cement tanks

Cylinder

  • Segregate copper cylinders, insulation jackets and pre-insulated cylinders
  • Take care removing avoiding damage
  • There are refurbishment markets and resale/scrap value

Pipes

  • Pipes or voids
  • Unlagging pipes is labour intensive, expensive and often incomplete
  • If pipes being reused leave on and cover with more high performance insulation
  • Insulated foam rubber is easily removed unless taped at all joints
  • Insulated foam rubber is easily reusable
  • Lead
  • Recycle via scrap merchant to lead roofing manufacturers
  • Copper
  • Recycle pipe via scrap merchant
  • Recycle earth bonding by separating PVC sheathing and copper
  • Plastics
  • Internally: Its too soon to be replacing them
  • Recycle by diverting them from landfill

Heat source

  • Heating and/or Hot water Boilers
  • Remove low A-D rated boilers or if incompatible with updated system
  • Strong refurbishment and resale market exists
  • Damaged boilers can be used for salvaging components to repair others
  • Water heaters over sinks

Tanks

  • Inspect for corrosion or other
  • Inspect valve for corrosion deposits or operational weakness or failure
  • Replace valves with low noise, efficient filling and minimise water loss

Cylinders

  • _

Taps

  • Sink Taps variable flow settings with 2 stops
  • Low flow sprinkler and full flow to fill sink and between
  • Valves
  • Isolator/flow restrictor valves on supplies, set low

Domestic Water supply Replacement

Pipes or void Insulation

  • Lagging pipes is labour intensive and often incomplete
  • Insulated foam rubber is okay if sizes are available
  • Corners, tees and bends often inadequately done
  • Consider filling the voids they are contained within
  • Pour in or spray on fibrous materials fills voids well

Pipes

  • Reuse existing, teeing off where required, if possible
  • New Materials
  • Copper
  • Add earth bonding
  • Plastics
  • What design life?
  • What guarantees?

Heat source

  • Boilers
  • Condensing boilers
  • Use SEDBUK Efficiency Rating A, no less
  • Gas: 91.3% – 90.0%; LPG: 93.3% – 90.0%; Oil: 97.0% – 90.0%
  • Ensure in-use performance is optimum
  • CHP
  • Solar Thermal Panels
  • Geothermal
  • Others?

Tanks

Cylinders

  • Pre-insulated and certified for Future Building Regulations requirements
  • Accommodate Solar Thermal or other sources

Taps

  • Low flow sprinklers
  • Proximity taps
  • Isolator/flow restrictor valves on supplies set low
  • Low water WC & Cisterns
  • Low flush 4.5 litre
  • Dual flush 4.5/2.5 litre

Showers

  • Not electric heater shower
  • Hot water supply
  • Not power shower
  • Low water use showers gravity-fed
  • Valves
  • Isolate all appliances, etc. with flow reduction/isolation valves

Painting and Decorating Refurbishment

Health and Safety:

  • Older properties may have arsenic in paints (dark green and many layers down in old paint build up)
  • New properties may have arsenic based preservative treatments in timber
  • Protection of labour with breathing filter is acceptable
  • Protection of labour with breathing apparatus is impractical and unwelcome

Painting and Decorating Removal

Health and Safety:

  • Older properties may have arsenic in paints (dark green and many layers down in old paint build up)
  • New properties may have arsenic based preservative treatments in timber
  • Protection of labour with breathing filtre is acceptable
  • Protection of labour with breathing apparatus is impractical and unwelcome by tradesmen
  • Removal of preservative treated joinery to hazardous waste site is easy expensive inappropriate solution
  • Burning on site is not the solution and a waste of energy

Painting and Decorating New

  • Use natural water-based low-VOC paints stains and other finishes
  • Avoid synthetic Low-VOC or solvent-based

Condensation eradication Refurbishment

Airtightness

  • Build-tight ventilate-right
  • Windows and doors
  • Testing of fabric
  • Sealants (benign type?)

Insulation

  • Natural Insulation
  • Hygroscopic insulation in breathing construction?
  • Airtightness layer
  • Vapour Barrier (Vapour check)
  • Breather Membranes

Ventilation

  • Passive stack ventilation
  • Mechanical Ventilation (extraction) with Heat Recovery

Condensation eradication Removal

Airtightness

  • Build-tight ventilate-right
  • Windows and doors
  • Testing of fabric
  • Sealant replacement (benign type?)

Insulation

  • Natural Insulation
  • Hygroscopic insulation in breathing construction?

Airtightness layer

  • Vapour Barrier (Vapour check)
  • Breather Membranes

Heating:

  • Free standing paraffin heaters

Ventilation

  • Mechanical Ventilation without Heat Recovery

Condensation eradication: New work

Airtightness

  • Build-tight ventilate-right
  • Windows and doors
  • Testing of fabric
  • Sealants: (benign type?)

Insulation

  • Natural Insulation
  • Hygroscopic insulation in breathing construction?

Airtightness layer

  • Vapour Barrier (Vapour check)
  • Breather Membranes

Ventilation

  • Passive stack ventilation
  • Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery

Roof Repairs

  • Durability and life expectancy: any time left?
  • Necessary?

Roof Replacement Removal

  • Salvage Industry established
  • Palleting/crating, restraint/protection, labelling/scheduling

Roof Replacement

  • Compatible weight with existing roof based on existing loads

Basements:

Space for stuff

  • If there is a basement that can be used for storage vessels then many higher grade environmental improvements can be considered:
  • Rainwater Harvesting for reuse in:
  • flushing toilets,
  • washing machines,
  • garden irrigation/watering
  • washing cars
  • Composting toilet chamber for generating compost for the garden
  • Thermal store for inter-seasonal heat transfers using solar thermal panels and heat recovery on waste pipes and other sources.
  • Storage for spare materials from the work for use in long term maintenance

Construction

  •           Determine underlying subsoil and rock formation location and depth
  •           If rock formation is sloping consider basements located at the place where the rock is deepest to avoid excavating too much rock.
  •           If existing basements exist consider reusing them rather than backfilling.

© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
2001 – 14th November 2013 – 25th October 2016


GBE Checklist Refurbishment Decent Homes
Index:


GBE Checklist Refurbishment Decent Homes
Images:


GBE Checklist Refurbishment Decent Homes
See Also:


© GBE NGS ASWS BrianSpecMan aka Brian Murphy
10th November 2013 – 26th August 2015

2 Comments

  • Anonymous says:

    How do you copyright content on your site (Webcomic specifically)?

    • BrianSpecMan says:

      Copyright convention is to use the correct (c) symbol, the date and your identifier (Name or company) on all of your work.
      In this case at the footer of each page and in each document.
      In the case of a comic possible in each image, but that sounds excessive.
      Additional precautions (expensive) is to send two stamped addressed and post marked letters containing print out of your material to your solicitor and your self, on the back of the envelop describe the content so you know what is inside; one for reference and one for evidence; never open them except in the case of infringement and in court in front of the judge.
      But usually a solicitors letter is enough to stop an infringement continuing.
      Except perhaps if the mafia or the chinese equivalent are behind it.
      And in Chine gross copyright infringement is backed by their government.
      Then approach with concealed scuba diving kit under chain mail armour.

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